Kenyan oil reserves are of quality

Kenyan oil reserves are of quality

Tullow Oil plc (Tullow) has announced that the Emekuya-1 well in Block 13T, Northern Kenya has encountered around 75 metres of net oil pay in two zones.

Emekuya-1 is located 2.5 km north of Etom-2 and had the objective of drilling a fault block on the flank of the Greater Etom structure. The well was drilled by the PR Marriott Rig-46 to a total measured depth of 1,356 metres and penetrated reservoir quality Miocene sandstones which correlate to those seen in the successful Etom-2 well.

Downhole pressure measurements and fluid samples suggest that the main oil reservoir is on the same static pressure gradient as the Etom-2 well which demonstrates that a major part of the Greater Etom structure is oil-filled. The reservoir sands encountered also appear to be extensive which further de-risks the northern play area and bodes well for future exploration in the region.

The rig will be moved to drill an up-dip appraisal well on the Greater Etom structure. Tullow operates Blocks 13T and 10BB with 50% equity and is partnered by Africa Oil Corporation and Maersk Oil both with 25%.

Angus McCoss, Exploration Director, said:

“The Emekuya-1 exploratory appraisal well has made an important discovery in the northern part of the South Lokichar Basin. This well has proven oil charge across a significant part of the Greater Etom structure and we are very encouraged by the quality and particularly the regional extent of the reservoir. We now look forward to the remainder of the Kenya exploration and appraisal campaign in support of the ongoing work to prepare this important asset for Full Field Development.”

 The government spent more than double the amount on fossil fuels as it did on renewable energy overseas, according to research published today by the Catholic aid agency CAFOD.

The figures, commissioned by CAFOD and produced by the Overseas Development Institute (ODI), show that more than 46% of UK spending on energy in developing countries went on fossil fuels, compared to 22% on renewable energy. In total, the UK spent $9.73bn supporting energy overseas over a five-year period. Of the UK’s export finance, over 99% went on fossil fuels.